Categories
Uncategorized

Do not hire a former employee without asking these questions

If you have an open position, rehiring a former employee, known as a boomerang, may seem like the easy answer because they already know the company culture, business nuances, and people. But there are several reasons why they might not be the right person for the job. The author presents five questions managers should ask…

If you have an open job, hiring a former employee (also known as a boomerang) may seem like the easiest solution. They are familiar with the culture, business nuances and people of the company. There are many reasons they may not be the right candidate for the job. Five questions are suggested by the author to help managers evaluate former employees before they hire them.

Many employees are looking for the next opportunity and are moving. They may be looking for a new challenge, more money or a way to improve their careers. What if they decide to leave your company, realize that the new opportunity isn’t as good as they thought ,, or they have new skills and want to return? Do you need to hire them?

Rehiring a former employee, known as a boomerang, may seem like the easy answer because they already know the company culture, business nuances, and people, but there are several reasons why they might not be the right person for the job. These are five questions that managers should ask before hiring a former employee.

Why am I not hiring the boomerang worker? It seems like an easy choice.

The employee is familiar with the company but the job they are applying for is not the same as their previous one. Many employees will return to their employer for a higher-ranking or different job. You should think about how they will adapt to the new role and whether your colleagues will view them as competent for that position. Talk to their former manager, HR and other cross-functional stakeholders about whether they should be considered for rehire. Also, discuss their soft skills and adaptability to changing situations. This will allow you to see potential roadblocks that could hinder the boomerang’s progress in their new role.

Next, think about how they will fit in to the culture of your team. Are they the same team or have the members changed? How will the boomerang work with the existing employees if it is a new team? What about former peers and colleagues? How will this affect the team dynamics? What can you do to make sure that the transition is smooth for both the boomerang team and your own?

Do you think that “easier” means “no ramp-time”? If they are returning to the same team, they may feel it doesn’t require much onboarding. However, companies, teams and processes change and grow, so they should get the same amount as new employees. It’s great if they can get back to the swing of things quickly.

Does boomerang have the right skills and abilities to help the business grow?

You are familiar with the skills and abilities of the employee before they left the company. What skills and experiences have they acquired since leaving? Are those skills relevant to the job and will they help the company advance? It is crucial that the boomerang has the right skills to move the company forward based on their job responsibilities and business requirements.

Is unconscious bias influencing me?

Employees who leave a company often stay in touch with their former colleagues. You might have unconscious bias if you remain friendly with the boomerang employee, and talk to them about the role you are hiring for. You should consider whether the job description was written objectively or to match the experience and level of the potential boomerang. This could be a problem for the business.

Unconscious bias can also affect how you manage your friend-employee. Being a “frien-ager” — a friend who bec

Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.